TEST 2: Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Power

Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Power. How To Test The Crankshaft Position Sensor (2000-2002 1.8L Nissan Sentra)

So far, your test results confirm that the crankshaft position sensor is not creating an ON/OFF voltage. So we're now gonna' make sure that the sensor is being fed 12 volts.

The wire that feeds these 12 Volts is the white (WHT) wire of the cranks sensor connector. In the photo above, this white (WHT) wire is labeled with the number 3..

IMPORTANT: Do not probe the front of the connector with your multimeter test leads or you will damage the connector and the female terminal in inside it. To check for power or ground, you need to use a back probe or a wire piercing probe.

Let's get started:

  1. 1

    Place the multimeter in Volts DC mode and with the red multimeter test lead probe the white wire that connects to the terminal identified with the number 3.

  2. 2

    Connect the black lead of the multimeter to directly on the battery negative terminal.

  3. 3

    When everything is set up, have an assistant turn the key to the On position inside of the car. You don't need to crank the vehicle for this test, since voltage will be present with just the key in the On position.

  4. 4

    If the all is OK with this circuit, then your multimeter will display 10-12 Volts DC.

Let's take a look at what your test results mean:

CASE 1: The multimeter showed 10-12 Volts when the ignition was turned On. This test result confirms that the crank sensor is getting power.

Now, we need to make sure that the crank sensor has a good ground. For this test go to: TEST 3: Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Ground.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT show 10-12 Volts when the ignition was turned On. This result tells you that the crank sensor does not have power.

This result exonerates the crankshaft position sensor as the cause of the cranks but does not start condition you're trying to solve, since without power, the crank sensor can not create a signal.

TEST 3: Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Ground

Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Ground. How To Test The Crankshaft Position Sensor (2000-2002 1.8L Nissan Sentra)

If you've reached this point you have confirmed that the crank sensor is not creating an on/off signal voltage and that it is getting power. Now in this test section we are going to make sure that the black wire of the crank sensor connector is eating it with ground.

In the photo above, the black (BLK) wire is identified with the number 1.

IMPORTANT: Do not probe the front of the connector with your multimeter test leads or you will damage the connector and the female terminal in inside it. To check for power or ground, you need to use a back probe or a wire piercing probe.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Place the multimeter in Volts DC mode and with the black (BLK) multimeter test lead probe the black wire that connects to the terminal identified with the number 1.

  2. 2

    Connect the red lead of the multimeter to directly on the battery positive (+) terminal.

  3. 4

    If the all is OK with this circuit, then your multimeter will display 10-12 Volts DC whether the key is ON or not.

Let's take a look at what your test results mean


CASE 1: The multimeter showed 10-12 Volts when the ignition was turned On. This test result confirms that the crank sensor is getting ground.

So, if the crank sensor is not producing an ON/OFF signal, and it's getting power and ground, then you can correctly conclude that it's bad and needs to be replaced.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT show 10-12 Volts when the ignition was turned On. This result tells you that the crank sensor does not have ground.

This result exonerates the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor as the cause of the cranks but does not start condition you're trying to solve, since without power, the crank sensor can not create a signal.