CAM Sensor TEST 2: Power Supply

How To Test The Cam Sensor (Chrysler 2.0L, 2.4L)

The camshaft position (CMP) sensor needs power to work. Without power, the cam sensor will not produce a cam signal.

This power is in the form of 8 Volts, which the PCM (Powertrain Control Module=Fuel Injection Computer) supplies.

IMPORTANT: Be very careful not to short this wire to ground... or you could damage the PCM. Also, do not use a test light to verify this voltage... use a multimeter.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    With your multimeter still in Volts DC mode, probe the wire that connects to the terminal identified by the number 1 in the image viewer, with red multimeter lead. As in the CMP TEST 1, pierce the wire with an appropriate tool. Do not probe the front of the connector.

  2. 2

    Ground the black lead of the multimeter to a good ground point on the engine.

  3. 3

    When everything is set up, have you helper turn the key to the On position.

  4. 4

    If all is good with this circuit, your multimeter should register 8 Volts.

OK, let's interpret the multimeter test results you just obtained. Choose from the CASES below that best match your specific results:

CASE 1: Your multimeter registered 8 Volts DC when the key was turned On. This indicates that the camshaft position sensor on your Chrysler (or Dodge or Plymouth SOHC 2.0L) is getting a good supply of juice. The next test is to test the sensor ground circuit, go to CAM Sensor TEST 3

CASE 2: Your multimeter DID NOT register 8 Volts DC when the key was turned On, recheck your connections and try the test again. If still no 8 Volts, then this test result eliminates the cam sensor as BAD, since without this voltage, the cam sensor will not produce a cam signal.

CAM Sensor TEST 3: Verifying Ground

How To Test The Cam Sensor (Chrysler 2.0L, 2.4L)

This is the last test to perform to be able to decisively say that the cam sensor is BAD.

So far, you have verified two very important things:

One: That the cam sensor is not producing a cam signal (TEST 1).

Two: That the cam sensor is getting power (TEST 2).

In this test step you're gonna' check it's ground circuit.

IMPORTANT: You got to be very careful not to short this wire to power (battery voltage)... since you run the risk of damaging the PCM. Also, do not use a test light to verify this voltage... use a multimeter.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    With your multimeter still in Volts DC mode, probe the wire that connects to the terminal identified by the number 2 in the image viewer, with black multimeter lead. Do not probe the front of the cam sensor connector to check this ground. Pierce the wire with an appropriate tool.

  2. 2

    Connect the red lead of your multimeter to the battery positive terminal.

  3. 3

    When everything is set up, have you helper turn the key to the On position.

  4. 4

    If all is good with this circuit, your multimeter should register battery voltage (12+ Volts).

Choose from the CASES below that best match your specific results:


CASE 1: The multimeter registered 12 Volts DC when the key was turned On. This indicates that the PCM is providing a ground path for the CAM sensor, so after having completed CMP TEST 1 and CMP TEST 2, this result also let's you know that the CMP sensor is BAD. Replace the CMP sensor.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT register 12 Volts DC when the key was turned On, recheck your connections and try the test again... if your multimeter still does not register the 12 Volts, then you have just eliminated the CAM sensor as BAD. Without this ground path, the cam sensor will not work.